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Good work dear Anne

20 Oct 2014

My vote

18 Oct 2014

My vote

18 Oct 2014

https://www.facebook.com/savekobanii?fref=ts

18 Oct 2014

Siege of Kobanê
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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Siege_of_Koban%C3%AA

18 Oct 2014

No..... that is not true bcs Kurdish fighters in Kobanî They are defending their land .. people..
Dignity and freedom

18 Oct 2014

Yes

18 Oct 2014

Yes

17 Oct 2014

Hhhh. yes he can not

17 Oct 2014

Hhhhhh

16 Oct 2014

https://www.facebook.com/savekobanii?fref=ts

16 Oct 2014

Siege of Kobanê
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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Siege_of_Koban%C3%AA

16 Oct 2014

Name

The town of Kobanê was founded as a small settlement in 1892 under Ottoman rule.[2] As part of an Arabization efforts in the 1980's, the Syrian government officially renamed the town Ayn al-Arab meaning "spring of the arabs", a name rejected by the 90% Kurdish population and reverted in 2012 when the Kurdish Regional Government forces took control.[3][4][5] The origin of the Kurdish name Kobanê is unclear. Folk etymology attributes the name to the town's subsequent growth around the railway station built in 1911 along the Konya-Baghdad Railway. The name Kobanê may be a corruption of the word company, derived from the German railway company who built that section of the Konya-Baghdad railway.[4][5]
History

In the decades prior to World War I, the area was mainly populated by semi-nomadic Kurdish tribes, many but not all part of the Milli confederation. These tribes had recently migrated in from the north, pushing back the Arab tribes which had previously occupied the area. As the Baghdad Railway was being constructed, Kurdish raiders of the clans of Busrawi and Shahin Bey—rivals who lived on opposite sides of the valley in which the modern town is situated—reportedly harassed work crews attempting to mine basalt from the nearby hills, partially owing to the fact that the German companies responsible for its construction were lax in providing payment and compensation to local landowners.[6] German engineers staying in the area from 1912 to 1913 described "Arab Punar" as being a "small Kurdish village around 35 km east of the Euphrates" comprising a small cluster of square mud-brick huts, many with domed roofs; the local chief's hut was notable among these in its incorporation of European-style doors and windows and its concrete flooring. The area was apparently also known for its swarms of biting sand-flies.[7]

In 1915, Armenian refugees of the Armenian Genocide founded a village next to the railway station, and were soon joined by Kurds from nearby areas.[8] After the demarcation of the border with Turkey along the railway line in 1921, part of the town was left on the other side of the border, today incorporated into the Suruç district as Mürşitpınar where there is an eponymous border crossing.

The city's infrastructural layout was largely planned and constructed by French authorities during the Mandate period, and a number of French-built buildings are still standing and in use today.[1]

By the middle of the 20th century, there were three Armenian churches in the town, but most of the Armenian population emigrated to the Soviet Union in the 1960s.[9]
Syrian Civil War
Main article: Siege of Kobanê

During the Syrian Civil War, the People's Protection Units (YPG) captured Kobane on July 19, 2012.[10] Since July 2012, the city has been under Kurdish control, while the YPG and Kurdish politicians exercise autonomy for the area they consider part of Syrian Kurdistan.[11][12] After similar less intense events earlier in 2014, on 2 July the town and surrounding villages came under attack from fighters of the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS).[13] On September 16, the ISIS resumed its Siege of Kobanê with a full-scale assault from the west and south of the city. In October 2014 the defences were breached and on Tuesday, October 7, Turkey's President announced that the city would fall shortly unless more airstrikes and ground troops were deployed.[14] Shortly after this remark, it was reported that the situation changed in favor of the Kurds,[15] as US-led airstrikes were reported to be having an effect.

On 16 October 2014, Kurdish commander Baharin Kandal told the BBC that most Islamic State fighters had retreated from most of the town. There was two areas of continued resistance.[16]
Demographics

The city had a population of 44,821 at the Syrian census of 2004.[17] The majority of the population of the town is Kurdish and the remainder of the population includes Arab (5%), Turkmen (5%) and Armenian (1%) communities.
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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Koban%C3%AA

16 Oct 2014

Yes!

13 Oct 2014

http://www.cartoonmovement.com/cartoon/15254

07 Oct 2014

Funny

07 Oct 2014

Yes

07 Oct 2014

Yes

07 Oct 2014

Yes

04 Oct 2014